Book Haul: June 7

I haven’t had time to update this feature in a while so I’m choosing my favorite galleys that have come in!  Again, please remember that I will review as I am able and if a book doesn’t interest me enough to finish there will not be a review posted.

The Violinist’s Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code  (Sam Kean)
on sale 7/17/12

The Darkest Minds (Alexandra Bracken)

on sale 12/18/12

The Second Empress: A Novel of Napoleon’s Court (Michelle Moran)

on sale 9/14/12

(I am very excited for this title since her biography of Madame Tusssuad was incredible.)

The Victory Lab: The Secret Science of Winning Campaigns (Sasha Issenberg)

on sale 9/11/12

Check out my previous book haul posts:

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Book Haul: April 24

My first galley review will be up later this week and another is coming your way very soon! Just as a note, I will not be reviewing the books that I didn’t like/couldn’t bring myself to finish.  Here’s what came this week:


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The Wild Rose

The Wild Rose (Jennifer Donnelly)
on sale 5/22 


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My Last Empress: A Novel

My Last Empress (Da Chen)
10/2/2012


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Advent: A Novel

Advent (James Treadwell)
on sale 7/3/12

Book Haul: April 16

Though I’ve fallen behind on review copies already (see last week’s post for how many I received) I think there are some real winners in this week’s batch.  I’ll be reviewing these as I finish them! Without further introduction, here’s what came this week:

Dark Kiss (Michelle Rowan)
on sale 5/12 

Abdication (Juliet Nicholson)
5/22/2012

Gilt  (Katherine Longshore)
on sale 5/15/12

The Twisted Thread (Charlotte Bacon)

on sale now


Hypocrites & Half-Wits: A Daily Dose of Sanity from Cafe Hayek
on sale 7/1/2012

Klonopin Lunch: A Memoir

on sale 7/17/12


Book Haul: April 9

I know it’s a little early in my book-blogging career to start posting book hauls but I’ve been incredibly lucky this past week! I’ve received several review copies from publishers and I’ll be reviewing these as I finish them! Without further introduction, here’s what came this week:

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry (Rachel Joyce)
on sale 7/24/12 


The Book of Madness and Cures (Regina O’Melveny)
on sale now 

So Far Away (Meg Mitchell Moore)
on sale 5/29/12

Imperfect Bliss (Susan Fales-Hill)
on sale 7/3/2012 


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Kasher and the Rye (Moshe Kasher)
on sale now

Enchantments (Kathryn Harrison)
on sale now


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The Tragedy of Arthur (Arthur Philips)
on sale now

Paris in Love (Eloise James)
on sale April 17,2012

First Product Review!

Compiling my review portfolio for Kenyon Seminar I realized that I haven’t
done a beauty product review on my blog yet.
So here it goes:

Product: Benefit Erase Paste

Price: $26.00

Packaging: The bottom is a good quality glass and the top is sort of aluminum-like. The color scheme is a little
too girly for my tastes but that’s kind of Benefit’s schtick.

Claims: “This concentrated, creamy concealer brightens and camouflages in one easy step! ”
(from Benefit website)

What I think: This stuff is pretty amazing! I’ve been using it for about a year now and can
confidently say that it covers my under-eye circles very nicely. That being said it isn’t a miracle cream.
For mornings when a little peach-toned concealer isn’t enough I turn to another Benefit product, lemon aid. The two
used in combination can attack any dark circle problem. This stuff is far too thick to use on blemishes, plus it has a peachy
undertone I’m not sure would work too well on them.

Verdict: Buy it!

Has anyone else tried Benefit’s Erase Paste? What did you think?

The Children’s Hour

Warning: Non-fashion post below!

I promise a re-cap of my London weekend is coming sometime this week
(when the weekend is actually over and I have pictures uploaded!)

However, I feel the need to write about the performance I saw today ASAP:

The Children’s Hour

(starring Keira Knightley and Elizabeth Moss)

For a play whose central theme is gay love, there isn’t much mention of it in Lillian Hellman’s The Children’s Hour! Much like Knightley’s film Atonement a devastating lie ruins the lives of many in ways that cannot be reversed. Set in a 1930’s New England boarding school, the play attempts to show the effects of accusing someone of homosexuality. In the small town of the play, the repercussions are innumerable but the devastation, unfortunately, isn’t felt by the audience.

The script was a bit dry though the actor’s did their best to make the characters come to life–the only problem was, they never did. Between the stiff opening scenes. and Knightley’s constant accent slippage the characters failed to worm their way into the hearts of the audience. The detachment of the audience was furthered by the script’s odd focus on developing non-central characters throughout the first act. Little changed when the second act moved forward, despite the insight
into the central women’s lives. When Moss’s character commits suicide, instead of feeling intense sadness the audience feels nothing.

 

I would love the chance to see the 1961 film version of the play starring Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine to see
if the acting or the script was the essential flaw of this play. Here’s a clip of the movie to pique your interest:

 

Post more tomorrow,

A