Giveaway & Excerpt: The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness

Though I posted about The Book of Life (part of the A Discovery of Witches trilogy) before, I wanted to share an excerpt with you — and a chance to win a paperback copy! Read to the end of the post for contest details.

The paperback releases TODAY and I think you’ll love it. If you haven’t read the other books in the series, now is the perfect time to pick them up. The boxed set is available here.

Continue reading “Giveaway & Excerpt: The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness”

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Excerpt from : Making Your Mind Up by Jill Mansell

An Excerpt from MAKING YOUR MIND UP by Jill Mansell

 

The lane that ran alongside the garden of Hestacombe House was narrow and banked high on both sides with poppies, cow parsley, and blackberry bushes. Turning left, Tyler Klein worked out, would lead you back up to the village of Hestacombe. Turning right took you down to the lake. As he took the right turn, Tyler heard the sound of running feet and giggling.

Rounding the first bend in the lane, he saw two small children twenty or thirty yards away, clambering over a stile. Dressed in shorts, T–shirts, and baseball caps, the one in front was carrying a rolled–up yellow-and-white-striped striped towel, while his companion clutched a haphazard bundle of clothes. Glancing up the lane and spotting Tyler, they giggled again and leaped down from the stile into the cornfield beyond. By the time he reached the stile they’d scurried out of sight, no doubt having taken some shortcut back to the village following their dip in the lake.

Continue reading “Excerpt from : Making Your Mind Up by Jill Mansell”

Featured Title: Love by the Book by Melissa Pimentel

Love by the Book: A Novel

A conversation with Melissa Pimentel, author of LOVE BY THE BOOK

 

What type of research did you do for this book? Were there any guides or approaches you came across that didn’t make it into the final novel?

The novel sprung from my own experience of trying out different dating guides and blogging about the results—my “summer of scientific experiment,” as I like to call it—so I already had ag ood idea of how some of these guides worked and the results they produced.The rest was done by trawling through websites and archives for the best (or worst,depending on your point of view) dating guides throughout the ages. I thought it wasi mportant to get a snapshot of how social mores have evolved over the years, so I chose guides that were popular in their time—like The Technique of the Love Affair, which was the 1920s flapper’s courtship bible—to see how they’d fare today.There were a few books that didn’t make the cut because they were too similar to guides I’d already covered, or I just ran out of time! One in particular that I was sad to have missed wasa guide—written by former celebrity bodyguard Big Boom—called If You Want Closure in Your Relationship, Start with Your Legs. I mean, how can you not be intrigued by that title? But it tread on familiar ground, so I left it out. I’m still a little sad about missing that one.

  Continue reading “Featured Title: Love by the Book by Melissa Pimentel”

Giveaway: The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Real Magic

The Thinking Woman's Guide to Real Magic by Emily Croy Barker

 

Remember a few months ago when I reviewed The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Real Magic? Go check out the review, I’ll wait! Don’t you just want to read it? Not yet, okay well here’s a summary that put’s mine to shame:

Nora Fischer is a bluestocking-ish grad student with a stalled thesis, unsure future, and a broken heart. At a boring wedding reception, she finds herself in a beautiful garden near a tiny cemetery—and suddenly in a different, bizarre sort of world. Here she takes up with a group of glamorous new friends who throw incredible parties with the likes of Oscar Wilde. If things sometimes seem a little off-kilter, Nora’s having too good a time to notice, especially since her romance with the gorgeous Raclin is heating up.

 

When her head finally clears, Nora is shocked to find herself in a magical world where men rule with swords or spells and most women are illiterate chattel. Surviving here will take skills Nora never learned in graduate school. Her only real ally—and a reluctant one at that—is the magician Aruendiel, a grim, reclusive figure with a biting tongue and a murderous past. And it will take Nora becoming Aruendiel’s student—and learning magic herself—to survive. While waiting for a passage to her own world to open, Nora must weigh the chance to resume what she still considers her “real life” against the dangerous power of love and magic.

 

See, I told you you’d want to read it! In honor of its paperback release, I have the opportunity to giveaway a copy.  I Leave a comment below letting me know what your favorite witch in literature is (and don’t forget to leave your email). This giveaway is open to US residents.

End of Trilogies (The End of the Journey): The Magician’s Land by Lev Grossman

The Magician's Land by Lev Grossman

The Magician’s Land by Lev Grossman

Rating: 4/5

The Magician's Land (The Magicians, #3)

Finishing a series is difficult (just ask G.R.R. Martin!)

Many a great trilogy has fallen on its face in the final pages. Take Hunger Games, Divergent or the Matched Trilogy for instance. The world building is incredible….and then you get to the last book. Everything feels rushed and a little like the author is trying to force more story out of the world, instead of the world having a story to tell.

Fortunately, Grossman’s final Fillory novel doesn’t suffer from any of these issues. We find Quentin older and more mature, ready to face the imminent demise of Fillory. But since I don’t want to give anything away, here’s one of my favorite quotes from the novel:

“ ‘This is a feeling you had, Quentin,” she said. ‘Once, a very long time ago. A rare one. This is how you felt when you were eight years old, and you opened one of the Fillory books for the first time, and you felt awe and joy and hope and longing all in one. You felt them very strongly, Quentin. You dreamed of Fillory then, with a power and innocence that not many people ever experience.’”

 All of your favorite things from the previous books are there, from the magical animals, to the great banter, to the sly references to other novels. Grossman is so in touch with the process of reading and loving books. He built a world where characters love books as much as his readers do. Where everyone speaks in little jabs and references to other books. Where the way into a magical land is through the “Neitherlands” where there are endless libraries.

This book is perfect for lovers of fantasy books, for Potterheads, Nerdfighters, and those looking for a way to pass the time until the next GoT book. It’s also great for Holden Caulfield wannabe’s and those who grew up checking wardrobes for portals to Narnia.

An Interview with Lev Grossman

Today I’m pleased to be a part of the blog tour for Lev Grossman’s The Magician’s Land. I will have a review of the book up next week but I wanted to share an interview with the author. 

 

A Conversation with Lev Grossman

Q:  People considered The Magicians to be Harry Potter for grown-ups and an homage to writers like C.S. Lewis and J.K. Rowling. But in THE MAGICIAN’S LAND, Quentin is nearly thirty years-old. Can we expect any new allusions to those books? How has the series grown up over the years?

 

A:  On some level all the Magicians books are written as a conversation with Lewis and Rowling. It’s a complicated conversation – sometimes it’s affectionate, occasionally it’s rather heated – and it continues in The Magician’s Land. I thought Rowling let Harry off a little easy by never showing him to us at 30. We never really saw him having to deal with his traumatic past – his abusive childhood, his experience of violence and death, his massive world-saving celebrity as a teenager – and struggling to figure out what the rest of his life is about. Those are things Quentin has to do in The Magician’s Land. When you’re a magician, and there’s no ultimate evil to defeat, when you’re not a kid anymore, what is magic for?

As for Lewis, Narnia fans will pick up echoes of The Magician’s Nephew and The Last Battle, the stories of Narnia’s creation and of its destruction. Lewis made a bit of fetish of childhood and innocence: Narnia was a place for children, and when you grow up and get interested in adult things, you lose that special magic. You see that in Peter Pan too – it’s one of the dominant tropes of 20th century fantasy. In The Magician’s Land I wanted to think not just about what you lose when you grow up, but what you might gain. You lose the magic of innocence and wonder, but do you gain a richer, more complex kind of magic?

 

Q:You come from a family of serious academics. What was their reaction when you chose to write genre fiction rather than something more “literary”?

 

A: It sounds funny to say it, but writing The Magicians was a serious act of rebellion for me. Coming from the family I do, it was an act of calculated treason. I had to nerve myself up to do it. But I had to – it was the only way I could say what I wanted to say.  I couldn’t do anything else.

I think it’s fair to say that reactions were mixed. My mom was cautiously enthusiastic, and my brother and sister have been hugely helpful with the books. But I don’t think my father ever read any of The Magicians books.

 

Q: The Magicians books have stirred up a lot of controversy among readers.  They attack or invert the most sacred conventions of fantasy, and as a result, have divided the fantasy world.  Can you speak a bit about this diverse reader response?

 

A:  No question, the Magicians books are polarizing. They’re supposed to be. The same way Neuromancer did with science fiction, and Watchmen did with superhero comics, the Magicians books ask hard questions about fantasy. What kinds of people would really do magic, if it were really, and what would the practice of magic do to them? What would really go on in a school for magic, with a bunch of teenagers in a fairy castle being given supernatural powers? What would happen if you put in all the depression and the violence and the blowjobs and the drinking that Rowling leaves out? What would happen to those kids after they graduated? What would happen if you sent these kids through the looking glass, into a magical land that was in the grip of a civil war?

These aren’t the kinds of questions everybody wants asked, but that’s how genres evolve. Watchmen was a brutal interrogation of the superhero genre – and it was also the greatest superhero story ever written. You couldn’t write a comic book the same way after Watchmen was published.I’m not saying the Magicians books are the greatest fantasy novels ever written, but they’re asking the same kinds of questions.

 

Q:  What were your major influences from science fiction or fantasy genres? What about more mainstream, literary works? How do you see these manifesting themselves in THE MAGICIAN’S LAND?

 

A:  What got me started writing The Magicians was reading Susanna Clarke’s Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell in 2004. There were several novels around that time that did things with fantasy that had never been done before, used it to say things that had never been said before. George R.R. Martin’s books were like that, and so were Neil Gaiman’s, especially American Gods. So were Kelly Link’s. When I read those books, I knew that I had to be a part of whatever they were doing.

I also have a bit of an academic background – I spent a few years in graduate school, and I studied the literary canon, particularly the history of the novel, pretty intensely – and that comes out in the Magicians books too. You can find bits of Proust in them, and Fitzgerald, Woolf, Donne, Joyce, Chaucer, T.S. Eliot. You can find a lot of Evelyn Waugh – Brakebills owes a lot to Hogwarts, but it owes a lot more to the Oxford of Brideshead Revisited. I wanted to see what happens when you take techniques and tropes from literary fiction and transport them, illegally, across genre lines.

 

Q:  As a literary critic, you’ve worked to promote the value and respectability of genre fiction – one year you put George R.R. Martin at the top of Time’s list of books of the year. You did the same with Susanna Clarke and John Green. Does that fit in with what you do as a writer of fiction?

A:  In my own nerdy way I’m trying to start a revolution, or maybe I’m just trying to join one that got started without me. It’s a literary revolution, but not the usual kind, where people who are writing difficult, avant garde literature figure out a way to make it even more difficult and avant garde. I’m talking about a revolution of pleasure, where the question of a book’s worth is de-coupled from the question of whether or not it’s hard or unpleasant to read.

 

Q:  If The Magicians, The Magician King, and THE MAGICIAN’S LAND were made into movies or a television series, who would you envision playing Quentin and his friends?

A:  The challenge with the Magicians characters is to convey a lot of intelligence, and also to not be overly good-looking. They’re a clever lot, and they’re also very real – they look like real people. Ben Whishaw has probably aged out of the Quentin role, but people mention him to me a lot, and that seems right. Sometimes I pictured specific actors while I was writing – Eliot, for example, I imagine as something like Richard E. Grant in Withnail and I. I often imagine Alice as Thora Birch from Ghost World.

 

Q: There are a lot of tech references in The Magicians books that would seem more at home in science fiction than fantasy, ie. the origin of magic is described in hacker language.  Why did you choose to juxtapose so much tech with magic?

 

A: I’m very committed to the project of making the Magicians books feel real, and to that end I made a deal with myself: everything that’s real in our world would be real in Quentin’s. And that means including contemporary technology, cell phones and the Internet and so on.

But beyond that, I think the same people who are interested in technology in our world would be drawn to magic if it were real, as much as the Wiccan crowd. Magic is interesting and complicated and powerful the same way technology is, and it requires some of the same mental discipline.

Also, I’m a science fiction writer manqué. I like the way SF writers look at the world. I like to think I write about magic the way good SF writers write about technology.

 

Q: You have a degree in comparative literature from Harvard but dropped out before getting your Ph.D. from Yale. What made you decide not to become an academic yourself?

 

A: I can’t even remember what made me decide I wanted to be one in the first place, except that I was unemployed and wanted to read books and talk about them as much as possible. Which I did get to do, and I loved it. But I knew from watching my parents that the life of an academic is not a glamorous one. It is frequently an underpaid and inglorious one, except for the superstars, and it quickly became apparent that I wasn’t going to be one of those. Fortunately I married one instead.

 

Q:  You have an identical twin brother, Austin Grossman, who is also a Harvard grad and successful fantasy novelist. Why do you think you’ve traveled such similar paths professionally? How do you think growing up as twins shaped your writing, respectively?

 

A:  It’s a mystery. I don’t know if twins have much more insight into it than regular people have. Austin was a very successful video game designer in his 20s, whereas I spent most of that decade looking for a career of any kind. But then somehow, for some reason, we re-converged. It happens all the time, not just with our writing. We live on opposite coasts, and only see each other a few times a year, but there’s always some uncanny coincidence in what we’re doing, or wearing, or listening to, or reading.

Though I’m very conscious of the differences in our work too. We’ve read the same things, seen the same movies, and watched the same shows, so our cultural points of reference are all the same. We know all the same words. But he writes only in the first person, and I only write in the third person. We use the same raw materials to construct very different stories.

 

Q.  Over the past decade, fantasy has become more accepted in mainstream and literary circles. What do you think has changed and where do you see the genre going? Does fantasy get the respect it deserves among scholars?

 

A.  A lot has changed for fantasy in the last decade or so. The 1990’s were all about science fiction—Star Wars, Star Trek, the Matrix—but something changed around the turn of the millennium. After 2001 the popular imagination became focused on fantasy — Harry Potter and Twilight and The Lord of the Rings. En masse, we turned to fantasy for something we needed and weren’t finding elsewhere. What that is, it’s hard to say, but it’s led to a glorious resurgence of the genre. Fantasy is evolving and maturing. It’s definitely not just for kids anymore. Writers like Neil Gaiman, Susanna Clarke, China Mieville, George RR Martin and Kelly Link are making it more complex and interesting and sophisticated and powerful than it ever was before.

But no, as far as I can tell, it still gets very little respect from the academy.
Q:  What’s your favorite part of writing outside of reality?

 

A:  What makes fantasy interesting to me is what it can’t do. Magic doesn’t solve everybody’s problems. You have characters who are capable of drawing energy from invisible sources, making it crackle from their fingers, performing miracles. But when they’re done, they’re still who they are. Life is still life. Magic doesn’t change relationships. It doesn’t fix your neuroses. Those basic problems are still what they were, and they have to be solved the old-fashioned way, just like in any other novel.

 

Giveaway: Buttons for The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness

1389269907000-BAL

The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness

July 15, 2014

After traveling through time in SHADOW OF NIGHT, the second book in Deborah Harkness’s enchant­ing series, historian and witch Diana Bishop and vampire scientist Matthew Clairmont return to the present to face new crises and old enemies. At Matthew’s ancestral home at Sept-Tours, they re­unite with the cast of characters from A DISCOVERY OF WITCHES—with one significant exception. But the real threat to their future has yet to be revealed, and when it is, the search for Ashmole 782 and its miss­ing pages takes on even more urgency. In the tril­ogy’s final volume, Harkness deepens her themes of power and passion, family and caring, past deeds and their present consequences. In ancestral homes and university laboratories, using ancient knowl­edge and modern science, from the hills of the Auvergne to the palaces of Venice and beyond, the couple at last learn what the witches discovered so many centuries ago.

Remember last week when I mentioned that the conclusion to one of my favorite trilogies was coming out? Well, now you can win a button to celebrate the occasion! Leave me a comment below with your favorite witchy read and your email. Giveaway open from June 4-June 11.