What I Read: August 1-12

Sorry for the radio silence around here lately! I’ve been moving into my new place in North Carolina and reading like crazy so expect more posts soon. Here’s what I’ve read this week:

  1. Ten Things You Should Know About the Economy Before You Vote in November (Forbes): I am such a political news junkie right now and this article is right up my alley! I think everyone should be informed about the issues before they head to the polls and this article is a good start. 

  2. How to Be a Better Procrastinator (WSJ): Since I always have my fingers in a lot of pies, I like hearing that it can be productive! This article shows the ways that working on multiple projects can actually make you more productive.
  3. I’ve Forgotten How to Read Adult Novels (blog): I spend a lot of time reading YA literature and I make no apologies for my taste (check out my post about why I YA here). Reading about other people with the same “problem” makes me happy!
  4. Being a Confident Bada** Does Not Make a Female Athlete a Diva (Jezebel): As much as I love women’s olympic gymnastics, I was less than thrilled with the coverage NBC showed. The commentators regularly used sexist terms to talk about the gymnasts (re: calling them girls, divas, and moody). This article explores what the coverage exposed about the network. 

Week in Review: What I Read

Full of excitement, this week has seen the gradual wind-down of senior year begin. I’m running ragged trying to get transcripts sent, Academic Infractions Board Cases heard, and grad classes registered–but I love it!  Here’s what I read this week in between errands

  1. What Books Did People Read On the Titanic? (Bookriot): Saying I’m obsessed with the Titanic is a slight understatement. My roommate and I had the conversation that everyone has “their” tragedy and the sinking of the Titanic is definitely mine. For me it signifies the real end to everything I love about the Victorian era: new technology, W.T. Stead, billionaires, and dreams. Given all of this it’s no surprise that I jumped with joy at all of the press coverage for the centennial. This article was of utmost interest, because c’mon: books + Titanic = love.
  2. Is a Credit Union Your Savior From Student Loan Debt? (Forbes): Another timely article as I just had my loan exit interview here at Kenyon. With student debt rising there’s been an increased interest in how to keep the “next generation” from stumbling to financial ruin. This article is a new take on an old problem.
  3. Podcasts by Oxford University English Faculty (via Blackwell’s Bookshop): Okay, so this one isn’t strictly an article, but it’s a great listen all the same! One of my favorite things about being an English major is that I get to listen to great minds talk about great literature and now I can take it with me! (Bonus: these professors have British accents.)
  4. Tutoring Surges with Fight for Middle School Spots (NYT): Though I read this in the print edition–Kenyon graciously holds subscriptions to the NYT that are delivered to the dining hall Monday through Friday–it’s available online. It boggles my mind that competition is so tough just for middle school tests — I didn’t take a prep course for the SAT! The article reminds me a lot of the documentary Nursery University (check it out if you haven’t already).

Week in Review: What I Read

I inadvertendly culled together a list of feminist articles this week — probably because I have been thinking about B-school admissions for women!  Here’s a list of what I’ve been reading on the web this week:

  1. Keeping Your Maiden Name Could Be Strictly Business: An interesting article about the relative feminism of keeping your last name after marriage. It’s interesting that something that once denoted such a feminist statement has become a career move!
  2. The Fat Envelope Please: It’s no surprise that there has been an uptick in college applications, but what is surprising is that there are so many more females applying than men. Suddenly, what used to help get you into school (being a girl) has turned into what may keep you from getting in.
  3. Firebombing Clinics is Not That Funny: While we may disagree on the politics of Planned Parenthood, I’m hoping we can all agree that violence is never the answer. What exactly was putting lives in danger supposed to prove — that the clinic should take lives? A little strange, no?
  4. Young Consumers Switch Media 27 Times an Hour: As a social media intern for several different companies I constantly switch between platforms to get my news and keep up with the latest trend. These findings didn’t surprise me but they do make me concerned about what will happen to digital natives when they are forced to “uni-task”!