Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

Beauty Queens

by Libba Bray

Survival. Of the fittest.

The fifty contestants in the Miss Teen Dream Pageant thought this was going to be a fun trip to the beach, where they could parade in their state-appropriate costumes and compete in front of the cameras. But sadly, their airplane had another idea, crashing on a desert island and leaving the survivors stranded with little food, little water, and practically no eyeliner.
What’s a beauty queen to do? Continue to practice for the talent portion of the program – or wrestle snakes to the ground? Get a perfect tan – or learn to run wild? And what should happen when the sexy pirates show up?
Welcome to the heart of non-exfoliated darkness. Your tour guide? None other than Libba Bray, the hilarious, sensational, Printz Award-winning author of A Great and Terrible Beauty and Going Bovine. The result is a novel that will make you laugh, make you think, and make you never see beauty the same way again.

Book blurb from Amazon

Reviews for Beauty Queens

LATimes

YALSA

NYT

Booklist

Awards for Beauty Queens

Rainbow List 2012 – GLBTQ (ALA)

Audie Awards – Best Author Read Novel 

Best Books for Young Adults 2012 (Booklist)

Amelia Bloomer List 2012 – Feminism (ALA)

2012 Best Fiction for Young Adults (ALA)

Buy Beauty Queens

Indiebound

Amazon

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Get Beauty Queens at Your Library!

Durham County Public Library

Orange County Public Library

Chapel Hill Public Library

More by Libba Bray

*note: This page was created for my INLS 530 class at SILS UNC Chapel Hill*

Banned Books Week Is Here!

As a MSLS student, I am very rightfully enamored with the tradition of Banned Books Week. If you’re not familiar with the project, here’s a little blurb from the official website:

Banned Books Week is the national book community’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2012 celebration of Banned Books Week will be held from September 30 through October 6. Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. More than 11,300 books have been challenged since 1982. For more information on Banned Books Week, click here. According to the American Library Association, there were 326 challenges reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom in 2011, and many more go unreported.

Bill Moyers on Banned Books Week from BillMoyers.com on Vimeo.

So for your viewing pleasure here’s a little video about the importance of banned book week and what it means to censor reading. Enjoy!

Multi-Cultural YA Literature

 

This week in my young adult literature class (INLS 530: YA Literature and Resources), we talked about literature of diversity. Growing up where I did it was easy to think that only one race (white), one sexual orientation (straight), one religion (Christianity), and one dominant gender (male) existed. Most of the literature I read supported this view: Anne of Green Gable’s milky white skin, Winnie and Tuck’s straight love story, and Wendy‘s overbearing father.

Through reading Tyrell, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Down to the Bone and We Beat the Street I was introduced to an all-together different facet of YA literature. The importance of these stories is so great. Introduction to these stories should not occur at 22 as it did for me, it should be integrated into the cannon for 11-17 year olds.

Below is a video explaining the importance of representative stories. It’s a little long but incredibly moving. I hope you enjoy!

Week in Review: What I Read September 1-12

  1. Fitness vs. Fashion (NYT): As working out becomes more of a fad (see Yogalates, Zumba, Pure Barre, SoulCycle), everyone is trying to make money from it. With this, there has been a shift in what we wear to the gym. It’s no longer acceptable to work out in a ratty t-shirt; we must instead dress like workout Barbie and look perfect while sweating. This article discusses the intersection of fashion and fitness. I found it interesting to see the way the two connect!
  2. Gloria Steinem’s Apartment (Refinery29): I’ve always been fascinated by Steinem’s life so it’s no surprise that I gobbled up the chance to look inside her home! This article is more fun for me since Steinem allowed Shelby Knox to live with her while her career was getting off the ground.  (I met Shelby at NCCWSL)
  3. Feminism and Formula (Observer): Remember that controversial Time cover a few months ago? Ever since then there has been pretty intense discussion in the blogosphere about the importance/irrelevance of breast-feeding. With the new laws in NY about formula, it’s more important than ever to have an opinion on the issue. Here’s an article that discusses why feminists should stop quibbling about whether breastfeeding is good for babies and start fighting for better formula.
  4. BIC Pens for Women! (Jezebel): In another instance of marketing stupidity, BIC decided to market “pens for women” in the UK. Women took to amazon and wrote hilarious reviews about the product. This one’s just a good mid-week pick-me-up!
  5. Memory Keepers (Delta Sky): If you’re a regular reader of my blog, you know by now that I am in library school at UNC Chapel Hill. I decided to go to library school in part because I want to work in federal libraries so this article discussing the Library of Congress is right up my alley! Check it out for a peek at what goes on in a federal library, plus some great library pictures!
  6. Class Size of One (WSJ): As public school graduation rates become more abysmal, it’s not surprising that some parents choose different options for their children. The Wall Street Journal looked into the growing trend of for-profit companies creating schools where students are in classes one-on-one with their teachers. This is supposed to create new opportunities for students who struggle in the traditional classroom environment. While I’m not convinced of these school’s effectiveness, it makes for an interesting read!