Copyright & Fair Use

Today in my Collection Development class (INLS 513) we talked about the ways that copyright law affects libraries. Because copyright law in the US is so challenging to understand, we view several movies to help with our understanding. One student suggested that we check out the following film that uses Disney clips to explain copyright law. It’s adorable and informative — check it out!

Check back later this week for my holiday wish list series!

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Book Review: Dust and Shadow

Last week I created a mock-Booklist review for my collection development class. Different from my usual review writing style, this one focuses on the role of the book in trade. Let me know what you think of the new style!

 

Dust and Shadow: An Account of The Ripper Killings by Dr. John H. Watson
Faye, Lyndsay (author)

Dec. 2009.  325p.

Simon & Schuster, paperback, $15.00 (978-1416583318)

 

Dr. John H. Watson has kept silent about his role in the most notorious murder investigation of all time. Under the impression that the world would forget Jack the Ripper he opted to keep Sherlock Holmes’ name out of the papers, until now. As the murders in Whitechapel mount it becomes clear that there is more to the Ripper case than the papers ever reported. A whore-turned-detective, an accusation against Holmes and a rogue policeman come together to shed light on this mystery that history deemed unsolved. Set in London’s East End during the fall of 1888, Faye’s plot shows attention to historical detail. Victorian England comes to life under Faye’s thoughtful hand – with no detail from a woman’s dress to the smog filled air going unannounced. She adeptly narrates the case in the familiar voice of Dr. Watson, taking care to pick up realistic voices of East End peasants when necessary. The story swiftly careens from Polly Nichols to Mary Jane Kelly, with all of Holmes’ traditional snide wit intact. Readers of Caleb Carr and Matthew Pearl will love this fast-paced thriller. A fresh addition to the Sherlock Holmes’ canon, Dust and Shadow will please mystery readers and Ripper fans alike.

If You Liked Beauty Queens by Libba Bray….

Try These Titles!

The Wake of the Lorelei Lee: Being an Account of the Adventures of Jacky Faber, on her Way to Botany Bay by L.A. Meyer

As the new captain of the Lorelei Lee, Jacky Faber can’t wait to live an exciting life on the high seas. But when’s she is arrested and put on a ship headed for the prisoner’s island of Australia, Jacky gets a very different adventure than she expected.

Chime by Franny Billingsley

Briony Larkin has two secrets: she’s a witch and she is the reason her sister Rose became ill. Filled with twists and turns at ever page, this magical story will have you wondering what happens next.

Shine by Lauren Myracle

Cat’s friends mean everything to her, so when one of them is attacked for being himself she resolves to find out who is responsible. The down-to-earth writing and no-nonsense plot are sure to leave you wanting more.

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

Drawing has always been a part of Lina’s life but when Soviet’s forcer her family out of their home and into a Siberian work camp, her life may depend on it. Follow Lina as she tries to make sense of family, art and life in the midst of World War II.

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

When Ralph, Piggy and their friends survive a tragic plane-crash, they must find a way to survive on a remote island with no supplies, or adults. Things go from bad to worse as the boys slowly forget what it’s like to live in society.

Uglies by Scott Westerfield

Tally Youngblood has always dreamed of her sixteenth birthday when she can finally become pretty and move to New Pretty Town. When Tally’s new friend tells her about the other consequences of the surgery, Tally is forced to choose between what is right and what is easy.

Putting Makeup on the Fat Boy by Bil Wright

Carlos Duarte is not your typical high school student, for starters he’s fashionable, on trend and already has his dream job as a makeup artist. Can Carlos survive the cutthroat world of NYC makeup

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan

Hannah has committed a crime but not just any crime, a crime that is bad enough to have her skin melachromed. Walking around with red skin is bad enough, but when she finds out the government wants her dead she must join the Resistance and fight.

Alphas by Lisi Harrison

Invites to the exclusive Alpha Academy only go to the prettiest, most popular girls and Skye Hamilton finally scored a spot. Testing her physical, mental and emotional limits, Skye soon finds out that being the most popular isn’t enough.

Pageant Perfect Crime by Carolyn Keene

Girl Detective Nancy Drew is hot on the trail of a shoplifter when she finds out that the culprit may be in a local beauty pageant. Determined to solve the mystery, Nancy enrolls in the Miss Pretty Face River Heights Beauty Pageant. Follow Nancy as she tries to solve the case, compete in a pageant and keep her boyfriend!

 

If you missed the trailer for Beauty Queens by Libba Bray, check it out here.

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

Beauty Queens

by Libba Bray

Survival. Of the fittest.

The fifty contestants in the Miss Teen Dream Pageant thought this was going to be a fun trip to the beach, where they could parade in their state-appropriate costumes and compete in front of the cameras. But sadly, their airplane had another idea, crashing on a desert island and leaving the survivors stranded with little food, little water, and practically no eyeliner.
What’s a beauty queen to do? Continue to practice for the talent portion of the program – or wrestle snakes to the ground? Get a perfect tan – or learn to run wild? And what should happen when the sexy pirates show up?
Welcome to the heart of non-exfoliated darkness. Your tour guide? None other than Libba Bray, the hilarious, sensational, Printz Award-winning author of A Great and Terrible Beauty and Going Bovine. The result is a novel that will make you laugh, make you think, and make you never see beauty the same way again.

Book blurb from Amazon

Reviews for Beauty Queens

LATimes

YALSA

NYT

Booklist

Awards for Beauty Queens

Rainbow List 2012 – GLBTQ (ALA)

Audie Awards – Best Author Read Novel 

Best Books for Young Adults 2012 (Booklist)

Amelia Bloomer List 2012 – Feminism (ALA)

2012 Best Fiction for Young Adults (ALA)

Buy Beauty Queens

Indiebound

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Get Beauty Queens at Your Library!

Durham County Public Library

Orange County Public Library

Chapel Hill Public Library

More by Libba Bray

*note: This page was created for my INLS 530 class at SILS UNC Chapel Hill*

Banned Books Week Is Here!

As a MSLS student, I am very rightfully enamored with the tradition of Banned Books Week. If you’re not familiar with the project, here’s a little blurb from the official website:

Banned Books Week is the national book community’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2012 celebration of Banned Books Week will be held from September 30 through October 6. Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. More than 11,300 books have been challenged since 1982. For more information on Banned Books Week, click here. According to the American Library Association, there were 326 challenges reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom in 2011, and many more go unreported.

Bill Moyers on Banned Books Week from BillMoyers.com on Vimeo.

So for your viewing pleasure here’s a little video about the importance of banned book week and what it means to censor reading. Enjoy!

Multi-Cultural YA Literature

 

This week in my young adult literature class (INLS 530: YA Literature and Resources), we talked about literature of diversity. Growing up where I did it was easy to think that only one race (white), one sexual orientation (straight), one religion (Christianity), and one dominant gender (male) existed. Most of the literature I read supported this view: Anne of Green Gable’s milky white skin, Winnie and Tuck’s straight love story, and Wendy‘s overbearing father.

Through reading Tyrell, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Down to the Bone and We Beat the Street I was introduced to an all-together different facet of YA literature. The importance of these stories is so great. Introduction to these stories should not occur at 22 as it did for me, it should be integrated into the cannon for 11-17 year olds.

Below is a video explaining the importance of representative stories. It’s a little long but incredibly moving. I hope you enjoy!