Sunday Reading: January 27, 2013

It’s been a blustery few days here in Chapel Hill! Work at the library has been cancelled for the past few days due to icy conditions so I’ve had plenty of time to catch up on my reading. Here are the most interesting things I read this week:

Blog Post:

British Problems: Light-hearted and fun, this article was the perfect pick-me-up at the end of a long day.

BookishBabies

Bookish Babies: Just in case your moody-blues weren’t gone after reading the last post, these adorable photos are sure to put a smile on your face. Is there anything cuter than a baby with books?

Book:

84, Charing Cross Road
84, Charing Cross Road: If you didn’t already yearn for the lost art of letter writing, this book will certainly make you want to go buy stamps! The book, a novella really, contains Helen Hanff’s correspondence with an antiquarian bookstore in London. The letters were written between 1949 and 1969, offering a lovely peek into wartime Britain. Hanff is delightfully witty and the Britishisms are so much fun. It’s the perfect escape from mundane life and Hanff’s suggestions are sure to add to your must read pile! Here are a few of my favorite quotes:

“I do love secondhand books that open to the page some previous owner read oftenest. The day Hazlitt came he opened to ‘I hate to read new books,’ and I hollered ‘Comrade!’ to whoever owned it before me.”

Elizabeth will have to ascend the throne without me, teeth are all I’m going to see crowned for the next couple of years.”

“First, enclosed find $3, [Pride and Prejudice] arrived looking exactly as Jane ought to look, soft leather, slim and impeccable.”

“ A newspaper man I know, who was stationed in London during the war, says tourists go to England with preconceived notions, so they always find exactly what they go looking for. I told him I’d go looking for the England of English literature, and he said: ‘Then it’s there.’”

News Articles:

Making Herself the Lesson: When one woman was diagnosed with terminal cancer she decided to donate her body to science in a non-traditional way – she allowed nursing students to follow her journey.

Candace Bushnell

Real Life Carrie Bradshaw: Who would’ve thought that art imitates life so closely?! In this profile by the founder of The Hairpin we get a closer look at Candace Bushnell.

By the Book : J.K. Rowling: I am obviously late the the party on this one as the article ran in October but I’ve recently discovered NYT By the Book and have been reading the archives voraciously. Reading this led me down the rabbit hole and straight to other “By the Book” columns.

Magazine Article:

Let’s Talk (The New Yorker): The idea of the filibuster has fascinated me ever since I watched The West Wing. Though today’s filibusters are less of “a senator hoarsely rattling off recipes” and more of repeatedly taking attendance, the article was an enjoyable look behind the scenes of the Senate.

Sunday Reading

Lazy Reading in Bed

The semester is off to a roaring start but I’ve still had a little time to myself to read some interesting articles, blog posts and books. Here’s a run down of what I’ve enjoyed:

Blog Post: 

Coloring for Grownups: At Kenyon it was a given that around finals time the coloring books would come out. I thought it was just a liberal arts thing but someone out there thought adults needed their own set of crayons! Check out the link for a hilarious renaming of classic colors.

Article:

Journaling, There’s an app for that!: I’ve always thought keeping a journal is romantic, artistic and utterly scholarly. Unfortunately I’ve never been motivated enough to write like Sylvia Plath, Virginia Woolf, or Anais Nin. This app promises to make journal keeping easier — maybe it’ll keep me on track!

Book:

Chanel Bonfire by Wendy Lawless : I finished an ARC of this one over the holidays but it was  recently released, which means I’m free to gush all I want! This memoir is so different from others I’ve read — heartbreaking without being heartless, stunningly detailed without a heavy hand. There’s something about Wendy that reminds me of Capote’s Holly Golightly (who, incidentally, is wholly different from Audrey Hepburn’s as much as I love her). I’m convinced this is a better memoir than any I reading 2012 and it’ll be hard to top in the rest of 2013!

Past Week in Instagram


As my first semester of graduate school winds down, I’ve found myself enjoying the little things…

instagram december 1

1. A gift package from Books of Wonder for donating to their fundraising campaign.
2. Lunch in the UNC cafeteria.
3. Sunrise at the Orange County Public Library.
4. A little refreshment while at work.
5. Hot apple cider and a youtube catchup (featuring essiebutton).
6. A little Gloria Steinem while waiting for the bus!
7. New Christmas decorations from Target.
8. A peaceful bus ride back from campus.
9. Study snack + candle time.

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Week in Review

Week in Review: What I Read September 1-12

  1. Fitness vs. Fashion (NYT): As working out becomes more of a fad (see Yogalates, Zumba, Pure Barre, SoulCycle), everyone is trying to make money from it. With this, there has been a shift in what we wear to the gym. It’s no longer acceptable to work out in a ratty t-shirt; we must instead dress like workout Barbie and look perfect while sweating. This article discusses the intersection of fashion and fitness. I found it interesting to see the way the two connect!
  2. Gloria Steinem’s Apartment (Refinery29): I’ve always been fascinated by Steinem’s life so it’s no surprise that I gobbled up the chance to look inside her home! This article is more fun for me since Steinem allowed Shelby Knox to live with her while her career was getting off the ground.  (I met Shelby at NCCWSL)
  3. Feminism and Formula (Observer): Remember that controversial Time cover a few months ago? Ever since then there has been pretty intense discussion in the blogosphere about the importance/irrelevance of breast-feeding. With the new laws in NY about formula, it’s more important than ever to have an opinion on the issue. Here’s an article that discusses why feminists should stop quibbling about whether breastfeeding is good for babies and start fighting for better formula.
  4. BIC Pens for Women! (Jezebel): In another instance of marketing stupidity, BIC decided to market “pens for women” in the UK. Women took to amazon and wrote hilarious reviews about the product. This one’s just a good mid-week pick-me-up!
  5. Memory Keepers (Delta Sky): If you’re a regular reader of my blog, you know by now that I am in library school at UNC Chapel Hill. I decided to go to library school in part because I want to work in federal libraries so this article discussing the Library of Congress is right up my alley! Check it out for a peek at what goes on in a federal library, plus some great library pictures!
  6. Class Size of One (WSJ): As public school graduation rates become more abysmal, it’s not surprising that some parents choose different options for their children. The Wall Street Journal looked into the growing trend of for-profit companies creating schools where students are in classes one-on-one with their teachers. This is supposed to create new opportunities for students who struggle in the traditional classroom environment. While I’m not convinced of these school’s effectiveness, it makes for an interesting read!

Week In Review: August 13-18

It’s my second week of truly settling into my NC apartment so I’ve spent a lot of time exploring the city. Somewhere between sightseeing and grocery shopping, I found time to read some pretty great online articles. Here they are:

 

  1. 6 ways your schoolteacher sabotaged your business writing: As an English major I constantly found myself breaking “the rules” about writing that I learned in middle school. It’s interesting to think that the same things that enabled me to write have “sabotaged” me later in life. I’m not sure that I have as extreme a view as the author of this piece but the idea is an interesting one.
  2. A Professional Assessment of Twilight Sparkle as a Librarian: This one is a purely fun read! While I was abroad I had two friends with whom I had endless “My Little Pony” movie nights (not as lame as it sounds, I swear). By trying to analyze the episodes, the author brought me back to those nights — we found an episode that perfectly encapsulated 19thc. British foreign policy that we called “My Little Imperialist Pony!”
  3. Five Women Writers Tougher Than Hemingway: Hemingway + feminism. Enough said.
  4. Generation Y Leads in Book Buying: As interesting as the article is, the real gem here is the discussion beneath it. There’s an active group that insists Gen Y buys books they don’t read or that the stats don’t take into account the number of textbooks Gen Y is buying. While both opinions may have merit, I am frustrated that other generations continually view Gen Y as a “tech only” generation!
  5. Old Timey Slang to Bolster Your Vocabulary: This is another fun one full of terms I wish people still used. Someone should really bring “Lobbygow” back.  Not me, I’m still working to bring “sistren” back.
  6. Lemony Snicket on the Murder of His Books: Lauren Conrad recently did an arts and craft project on her blog and used the Series of Unfortunate Events books. Whether you agree with using books as objects or not, Snicket’s response is hilarious. Readers of his books will love the on point response!

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